Jack McCann gives us the low down on all you can do in Kerry's gorgeous seaside gem, Dingle...

Dingle town or An Daingean is a sheltered harbour located on the Dingle Peninsula. It has a population of about 1200 people who live there all year round. However during the summer months, the population triples in size (approx.) with an influx of tourists from every corner of the world. What can one do, if they find themselves among the thousands of tourists who end up in Dingle from June until August?

Lots of things, is the answer, you just need to know where to look.

The Dingle Way

Something that can be done at no cost, at least not on the pocket anyway, the physical cost is another matter. It covers 153 kilometres, beginning and ending in Tralee. It passes through Dingle Town in between visiting Annascaul and Dunquin, two other towns on the Dingle Peninsula. You can enter it at any point, and do as little of it or as much of it as you like.

Doing the Dingle Way is probably the best way to see the beautiful scenery that is on offer in Dingle Town and over the whole Dingle Peninsula. Well worth a day of your time.

Dingle Oceanworld Aquarium

This isn’t free, however, it’s not too expensive for the couple of hours that it can entertain you for. Adult tickets are €11.70, more importantly student tickets are €8.10! It’s not the greatest aquarium in the world, however on days when the wind is howling, mist is closing in and it’s raining, (weather at the time of writing) this is perfect.

Art in Stone

Run by an Italian, who has lived for over 20 years in Dingle. Personally, I’ve never been into his workshop, however, it always looked like a very interesting thing to have a look at, even if it’s only for ten minutes. It’s free to have a look around, and if you felt like purchasing something, the price of €15, including postage anywhere, seems very decent and won’t break a student’s bank, hopefully.

Fungi

Dingle’s talisman, one of the biggest reasons as to why many of the tourists head to the town. There are many tourist boats that you can get onto to get a glimpse of the playful dolphin who has made Dingle harbour his home for 30 years this year. It isn’t cheap, but worth it. It’s better to get a kayak, which cost a tenner or less and go out that way. Be warned he is huge, about 3 meters long or so.

Paidi O’Se’s Pub

This isn’t in Dingle, 15 minutes west of it, but considering nearly everybody knows the man behind it, it had to be mentioned. Dingle itself has a pub to people ratio of about 1:55. So there are plenty of places to go after a long day of seeing the sites. However, you have to just drop into Paidi’s at least once whilst in the area, there are years upon years of the pubs history plastered on the walls and is an overall unique experience.

So if you end up in the locality during a road-trip around Ireland, there is something for every personality in the car, no matter who they are. Those mentioned are only the tip of the Ice-berg.