According to an Irish Times report, computer science, construction and business courses had the highest non-progression rates.
The Irish Times has published a report illustrating drop-out rates from third level institutions.
 
From the figures obtained for courses between 2015 and 2016, about one in six students did not progress past first year of their course. University courses had the lowest drop-out rates, as opposed to higher certificate (level six) and ordinary degree (level seven) courses at institutes of technology, which had the highest non-progression rates.
 
Courses with high-drop out rates typically have a maths-intensive curriculum and are in the areas of computer science, construction and business. The drop-out rates in computer sciences are of particular concern to experts, as there is said to be a severe lack of skills in the informations and computer technology (ICT) sector.
 
Overall, Ireland has one of the highest numbers of young people going on to third level education in Europe, with almost 60 per cent of all school-leavers attending universities or IT's. In contrast to this, there has been a large drop in school-leavers going into apprenticeships or other job training. Our third level drop-out rate has remained relatively consistent and in line with European averages. 
 
According to research, a student's previous academic levels are the strongest factor behind whether they drop out of their course. Other notable factors include financial difficulties, health issues or choosing the wrong course.