Snitch doesn’t pack any real punch for Campus contributor, Miriam Doona.

Snitch is the uninspiring tale of family loyalty and drug dealings. The film begins with a young Jason Collins agreeing to a box of MDMA being shipped to his address for holding until long-time friend Craig can collect it. Craig was subsequently arrested, and when the Ecstasy arrives Jason is also incarcerated. Craig has sold him out.

The minimum mandatory sentence for such an offence is 10 years, as the quantity of narcotics was sufficient to supply. As unfortunate Jason's father John Matthews (Dwayne Johnson) discovers, the only way to reduce his son's sentence is to aid and abet the arrest of a major drug dealer. Construction worker Matthews rises to the challenge and embarks on a seedy journey delving him deep into the dark work of drug barons and trafficking. He becomes a snitch.

Enter rootless and self-serving federal prosecutor Joanne Keeghan (Susan Sarandon). She and undercover agent Cooper (Barry Pepper) coordinate the whole operation with the lure of Jason's freedom.

The usual daylight shooting, high speed chases and car explosions ensue as Matthews single handedly is successfully responsible for the entire demise of a Mexican drug cartel. The arrest of head honcho, Juan Carlos “El Topo” Pintera (Benjamin Bratt) is secured.

Bratt’s performance is the most believable element to this film, which is based (loosely, I would imagine) on a true story. All is well and Jason, battered from his spell in prison is returned home.

The plot is deeply flawed and it is all too polished to pack any real punch.

Snitch is in cinemas tomorrow (June 21).