In just two years Jobbio has gone from an unknown start-up with a few employees, to a company used by global brands such as Ryanair and Dropbox, they now hire 26 full time staff members and have offices in Dublin, London and New York.
What’s lead to such rapid success? 
 
According to CEO, Stephen Quinn, “Jobbio is reinventing recruitment in a way that is beautiful, seamless and effective.”  
 
It is a modern way to advertise and apply for jobs.  It allows jobseekers to set up a multimedia profile to promote themselves and search for jobs while it allows employers to promote their brand, scout relevant talent and manage applications easily. 
 
Stephen and his brother John founded Jobbio in 2013 with the idea of creating a better platform for recruitment for both jobseekers and employers.
 
Stephen, a former student of UCD and Smurfit Business School, identified with the inefficiency of applying for jobs.  
 
The process was slow and laboured often involving multiple job boards and sites and compiling different CVs to suit different job openings.  
 
From an employer’s perspective, John, former owner of Champion sports, was being inundated with CVs that were being filed but not fully utilised.  It meant a mound of paper and a lot of work.
 
They knew they had a global opportunity if they could find a solution that fixed recruitment for both parties. 
 
In 2014, Jobbio was named as one of Enterprise Ireland’s “High Potential Start-Ups”. They received €1 million in funding through Enterprise Ireland, MXC Capital, AIB Seed Capital Fund and private investment.  
 
Stephen says a belief in your own product is essential to a new start-up.
 
“You have to convince others that this is a business that can have a significant impact on the market.  You must convince staff who could work anywhere, investors who can choose from thousands of companies to invest in and users or customers to pick you over others.” 
 
Currently over 2,000 companies use Jobbio to promote their brand and advertise job openings while over 100,000 jobseekers or “talent” have registered with the site.  
 
Stephen says that early participation was key in getting the company off the ground. “We were very focused on making sales quickly.  Feedback from our first customers was of huge benefit to us.”   
 
They launched the Jobbio app in March to enhance the mobile element and appeal to a wider market.  Figures from a survey conducted by Jobbio found that 72% of people found it highly important that they could research and apply for jobs online via smartphone or tablet. 
 
One of the key problems Jobbio claims to eliminate is that of “flat” or “antique” CVs.  Being able to add videos, pictures and links to projects offers jobseekers a chance to differentiate themselves from similar applicants.
 
In doing so it gives employers a sense of the personality of the applicant before they even interview them and thus a more efficient selection process.  Employers can find relevant up-to-date CVs instantly rather than searching obsolete files.
 
The live feature of Jobbio is one of its main selling points.  Users can change and update their bio on the go and even research different brands anonymously before applying for a position.
 
“Jobbio is a marketplace where you can browse incredible companies, learn all about them, discover incredible opportunities and then apply with ease”, said Stephen.  
 
These companies which include Bank of Ireland, Uber and Airbnb are now the “greatest feature” of Jobbio, according to the CEO. 
 
What next for Jobbio?  There are four key areas in the business: sales, tech, marketing and customer experience.
 
The strategy across these areas is to follow the customers.  Growth is particularly strong in the UK with six full time staff members based in the London office.  
 
There are currently two full time members in the New York office and 18 in Dublin.  
 
The priority is to nail the existing three markets before planning further expansion. 
 
“Jobbio is the type of business that with unlimitedfunds we could potentially set up in any city in the world.  However, we don’t have unlimited funds, we are still a very young business with a lot to learn,” Stephen said.  
 
When asked what advice he could offer to any potential entrepreneurs he stressed the importance of having some hands on experience in a start-up.  
 
“When I started I made lots of mistakes that I am sure I would have avoided if I had been involved in a start-up before Jobbio.  Don’t be afraid to ask for advice from people who have been down that road, who have been around the corners that you can’t see around yet.”