With actress Lucy Hale's recent comments on Instagram, Ciara Ferguson explores when self-improvement goes too far.
We all dislike certain aspects of ourselves. It could be something as miniscule as you don’t like your ears, something no-one else would ever notice about you, but it still bothers you. It is important as women that we don’t tear each other or ourselves down, but that we boost each other up, try and give each other confidence and try to be confident in ourselves.
 
Recently, American actress and singer Lucy Hale (28), best known as Aria Montgomery from Pretty Little Liars, posted a picture on Instagram of her and her Dad to her 18.5 million followers. The caption was nice and simple: “You taught me to have soul. I love you daddy.” But the problem came in the comments when she commented “ugh I was so fat.”
 
She is, in no way, shape or form “fat” in this picture and I’m sure in those 18.5 million followers, there were people much bigger than her in that picture, including myself, feeling extremely conscious about their weight as Hale, being an idol to many young girls, criticised her own weight in that way.
 
The fact that she began her sentence with “ugh” was also a problem, because it was as if she was associating not being stick thin with something extremely negative.
 
She has since come out on Twitter apologizing, saying: “Sometimes I forget that people are watching everything I do and I say things I don’t mean. I’m extremely sorry if my comment about my weight offended anyone. Sometimes we can be our own worst enemy. I know people look up to me and I should be way more aware of what I say sometimes. Thanks for the love and support. Hope y’all can forgive me!”
 
Some fans have commented things like, “Lucy, you don’t need to apologize for this” and “The world is far too sensitive. Say whatever the heck you wanna say! Be comfortable in your own skin! Screw everyone else!” and “You did nothing wrong, so sorry if people are on your case.”
 
I completely disagree. I understand that we are all human and that we all make mistakes and I also understand that everyone’s version of fat could be different and that everyone has insecurities, but I think in this situation, she was in the wrong and she absolutely had to apologize.
 
I am a huge fan of Lucy Hale, and have been watching Pretty Little Liars since I was around the age of 14. As the show is still continuing, I’m sure there are more 14 year olds starting to watch it now and looking up to the five main characters of the show and I think it’s dangerous for anyone, celebrity or not, to use the word “fat” in that way, especially because we as a society are trying to move away from the negative depiction of “fat”.
 
I am in no way encouraging people to be over-weight. But I’m not going to encourage people to be under-weight. I am encouraging people to be whatever weight they are comfortable with and be happy and confident and try not to compare yourself to other people, because we all come in different shapes and sizes.