General

How You Know You’ve Just Moved Up From the Country

So, you’ve finally left the bog. Here you are in a new, big city, sticking out like a sore thumb. Your ways are most definitely different to those of your housemates, so here’s how you know you’ve moved up from the country.  

 

You spend 99.99% of your time on public transport 

Life was easier when your mam would drive you to your friend’s house, collect you, drop you to school. No effort required. Now, you’re trying to keep up in life, rushing around to and from college on public transport. You also spend half your time on the bus travelling home on the weekends. The bus is always a good place to catch up on required reading, but despite your best intentions, we all know this is never going to happen. Bus Éireann and Expressway are here to help with a free €8 discount code on a student return ticket, making the thought of that bus journey a little less daunting. Expressway also has free 4g WiFi so you can scroll til your heart’s content! Pop onto Campus.ie to get your discount now!

 

 

You actually have to lock the doors now 

Down in the sticks, forgetting to lock the back door when leaving the house was never cause for alarm. Now, the very thought of it sends a shiver up your spine. Sure, you’d only be gone out five minutes and the fridge, your MacBook and the telly would have disappeared. Gone are those trusting days…. 

 

You realise that every meal does not involve spuds 

Potato cakes for breakfast, ham sandwich for lunch, meat, two veg and a pile of spuds for dinner. What is a burrito anyway? 

 

Your new address is a novelty 

Back home, your address was extremely vague. Only the local postman actually knew where to find you. Online orders? Forget it, you spent half your life directing DPD to your house, ten miles south of where the delivery man actually was. Now you have a road name AND a house number. The possibilities are endless.  

 

You tried to talk to your neighbour, but to no avail 

Back home, everybody knew everybody’s business. If you bumped into your neighbour, you’d be stuck for an hour and probably invited in for tea. You never thought you’d miss this, but now you do.